The Chelsea Pensioners

Today is my spot on the Worldwide Genealogy blog – a daily blog written by a collaborative group of genealogists/family historians and historians. Click on the image below to read my post about The Chelsea Pensioners of the 19th and 20th centuries.

Tuck postcard from the early 1900s - a Chelsea Pension

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If you decide to signup to access records from the Forces War Records website, type the code “AW40″ at the checkout to receive a 40% discount for any type of subscription.


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Reflections on the Tower of London’s poppies

© Essex Voices Past 2014.

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Full fathom five thy father lies: the sea-nymphs of the medieval world

Regular readers of my blog will know that beautiful medieval illuminated manuscripts have long held a particular fascination with me. Created in the medieval period – with some manuscripts now 700/800 years old – the medieval world seemed to have been inhabited by mythical creatures: jousting snails, cats in towers hurling missiles at their enemies, giant fish – to name a few. All elaborately and painstakingly drawn and painted by craftsmen from another era.

Today’s selection of images from the British Library’s collection of illuminated manuscripts is the sea-nymphs and mermaids (and a merman too!) of the medieval mind.

Click on any picture to be taken to the British Library’s full description of the image.

Detail of a mermaid sitting on a bar border holding her tail in one hand and a circular mirror in the other From Scholastic miscellany, (France, Central (Paris), between 1309 and 1316); shelfmark Burney 275 f.404Detail of a mermaid sitting on a bar border holding her tail in one hand and a circular mirror in the other. From Scholastic miscellany, (France, Central (Paris), between 1309 and 1316); shelfmark Burney 275 f.404

Miniature of a mermaid playing a harp luring sailors in a boat from Bestiary, Guillaume le Clerc (England, 2nd quarter of the 13th century); shelfmark Egerton 613 f.38Miniature of a mermaid playing a harp luring sailors in a boat. From Bestiary, Guillaume le Clerc (England, 2nd quarter of the 13th century); shelfmark Egerton 613 f.38

Detail of a miniature of a mermaid and a fish from Image du Monde (Le livre de clergie en roumans) (France, Central (Paris) and England, 2nd quarter of the 15th century); shelfmark Harley 334Detail of a miniature of a mermaid and a fish. From Image du Monde (Le livre de clergie en roumans) (France, Central (Paris) and England, 2nd quarter of the 15th century); shelfmark Harley 334.

Detail of a miniature a mermaid with a mirror and comb from Les Fais et les Dis des Romains et de autres gens (France, N. W., Normandy (possibly Rouen), c. 1460-1487); shelfmark Harley 4372 f.79vDetail of a miniature a mermaid with a mirror and comb. From from Les Fais et les Dis des Romains et de autres gens (France, N. W., Normandy (possibly Rouen), c. 1460-1487); shelfmark Harley 4372 f.79v

Detail of a miniature of the siren (Syrene) or mermaid who holds a fish, and the prow of a boat with two men in it, one rowing from Bestiary, with extracts from Giraldus Cambrensis on Irish birds (England, S. (Salisbury?), 2nd quarter of the 13th century); Harley 4751 f.47v.Detail of a miniature of the siren (Syrene) or mermaid who holds a fish, and the prow of a boat with two men in it, one rowing. From Bestiary, with extracts from Giraldus Cambrensis on Irish birds (England, S. (Salisbury?), 2nd quarter of the 13th century); Harley 4751 f.47v.

Detail of a miniature of a mermaid and merman with bow and arrow.  From Decretals of Gregory IX with glossa ordinaria (the 'Smithfield Decretals'), (France, S. (Toulouse?), Last quarter of the 13th century or 1st quarter of the 14th century); shelfmark Royal 10 E IV, f.3.Detail of a miniature of a mermaid and merman with bow and arrow from Decretals of Gregory IX with glossa ordinaria (the ‘Smithfield Decretals‘), (France, S. (Toulouse?), Last quarter of the 13th century or 1st quarter of the 14th century); shelfmark Royal 10 E IV, f.3.

Detail of a bas-de-page scene of a mermaid. From Decretals of Gregory IX with glossa ordinaria<em> (the 'Smithfield Decretals'), (France, S. (Toulouse?), Last quarter of the 13th century or 1st quarter of the 14th century); shelfmark Royal 10 E IV, f.47.Detail of a bas-de-page scene of a mermaid. From Decretals of Gregory IX with glossa ordinaria (the ‘Smithfield Decretals‘), (France, S. (Toulouse?), Last quarter of the 13th century or 1st quarter of the 14th century); shelfmark Royal 10 E IV, f.47.

Detail of a bas-de-page scene of two grotesques fighting with domestic implements; between them is a mermaid. From Decretals of Gregory IX with glossa ordinaria<em> (the 'Smithfield Decretals'), (France, S. (Toulouse?), Last quarter of the 13th century or 1st quarter of the 14th century); shelfmark Royal 10 E IV, f.69.Detail of a bas-de-page scene of two grotesques fighting with domestic implements; between them is a mermaid. From Decretals of Gregory IX with glossa ordinaria (the ‘Smithfield Decretals‘), (France, S. (Toulouse?), Last quarter of the 13th century or 1st quarter of the 14th century); shelfmark Royal 10 E IV, f.69.

 

Full fathom five thy father lies;
Of his bones are coral made;
Those are pearls that were his eyes;
Nothing of him that does fade,
But doth suffer a sea-change
Into something rich and strange.
Sea-nymphs hourly ring his knell:
Ding-dong,
Hark! Now I hear them – Ding-dong, bell.

William Shakespeare, The Tempest, circa 1610-11

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Thank you for reading this post.

You may also be interested in the following
Smithfield Decretals: The story of the sinful hermit
Smithfield Decretals: The story of the medieval spinster
The cats of the Macclesfield Psalter
Early-modern images
Images of Medieval animals
Images of Medieval music
Images of Tudors
Images of Medieval devils
Images of Medieval funerals
Images of Medieval cats

© Essex Voices Past 2014.

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Remembrance Sunday 2014: Great Dunmow’s Roll of Honour

Great Dunmow War Memorial

Remember the men of this place who died for freedom and honour A.D. 1914-1918

Percy Charles Archer: died 15 July 1917
John Lewis Pasteur Armstrong: died 22 June 1916
Frederick Attridge: died 9 October 1916
Frank William Bacon: died 4 December 1918
Amos Alfred Barrick: died 31 December 1916
George Henry Barrick: died 11 June 1918
Frederick John Bartley: died 26 March 1917
George Henry Beard: died 7 September 1916
Albert Brand: died 8 October 1915
Frederick J Burchell: died unknown
Alfred Richard Burton: died 5 April 1917
Harold Vincent Burton: died 22 December 1916
Thomas F Burton: died 29 November 1918
Edwyn (Edwin) Bush: died 24 April 1917
David William Button: died 8 December 1918
William Henry Carter: died 24 July 1918
Alfred Thomas Caton: died 13 April 1918
Frederick Chapman: died 6 December 1918
Frederick George Clarke: died 30 July 1916
Alfred Coates: died 21 May 1918
Stanley Richard Coates: died 2 September 1918
George Cock: died 4 January 1918
William Coppin: died unknown
Sydney Cox: died 13 August 1918
Albert Crow: died 1 November 1914
William Frederick Crow: died 5 October 1917
Benjamin Thomas De Voil: died 1 July 1916
Ernest Cecil Freshwater: died 8 May 1915
Arthur Edwin Greenleaf: died 3 August 1916
George Frederick Gunn: died 18 July 1917
Arthur Gypps: died 16 October 1917
Harry Hines Halls: died 26 March 1917
Ernest Edward Harris: died 8 August 1918
Frank Harris: died 21 November 1916
Leonard Melsome Hasler: died 21 September 1917
Stanley Howland: died 21 October 1916
Thomas David Jarvis: died 16 July 1916
Gordon Parnall Kemp: died 26 September 1917
Harold James Nelson Kemp: died 28 May 1916
George Henry Ledgerton: died 2 November 1917
Frederick James Watson Lines: died 12 December 1915
Frank J Lodge: died 26 March 1917
Arthur Thomas Lorkin: died 26 March 1917
Hayden Lyle: died 6 November 1918
Llewellyn Malcomson: died 5 October 1916
Leonard Frederick Mason: died 12 September 1918
Ralph Milbank: died 23 March 1918
George Nelson: died 3 November 1917
George William Perry: died 17 November 1916
Francis Louis Pitts: died 15 June 1915
Bertram James Porter: died 2 September 1918
George Rawlings: died unknown
Arthur T Reed: died unknown
Harry Charles Edwin Robinson: died 28 March 1918
Henry Alfred Robson: died 28 April 1917
Frederick Isaac Rootkin: died 22 August 1915
Frank Edward Sams: died 1 November 1914
William George Saunders: died 26 March 1918
William Sayer(s): died 29 March 1915
Harold Mackenzie Scarfe: died 3 May 1917
Charles Edwin Sewell: died 24 March 1915
Frank Sewell: died 18 May 1917
Sidney Sharp: died 1 October 1918
Walter Sharp: died 9 April 1915
Arthur Smith: died unknown
Sidney J Smith,unknown
Victor Spurgeon: died 8 October 1918
Percy A Stock: died 9 December 1917
Arthur George Stokes: died 26 October 1914
Ernest Archibald Stokes: died 19 February 1919
Edward Charles Stone: died 23 August 1918
William Matthew Stovold: died 6 November 1914
Montague Beavan Tench: died 10 August 1916
Harry Turbard: died 12 November 1915
Joseph A Turner: died unknwon
John S Wackrill: died 12 October 1918
William Waite: died 11 July 1917
John Joseph Walsh: died 19 November 1917
Edward Warner: died 21 March 1918
Hubert John Welch: died 29 September 1918
Arthur Albert Willett: died 25 February 1916
Frank Willett: died 23 October 1916
James Wilson: died 10 September 1915
A Edgar Yeldham: died 10 November 1917
Arthur William Young: died 21 November 1915

Not on the town’s war memorial but commemorated
on the Congregational Church’s memorial
Walter Vosper Jakins: died 10 July 1917

Buried in St Mary’s Churchyard but not
commemorated on the town’s War Memorial
Charles Henry Parham: died 30 June 1918
C Spiers: died 7 November 1918

They whom this tablet commemorates, at the call of King and country left all that was
dear to them to endure hardships and face dangers. And then passed out of the
sight of men by the path of duty and self-sacrifice giving up their lives
that others might life in freedom.
Let those who come after see to 
it that their names be not forgotten
(War Memorial in St Mary’s Church, Dunmow)

Tower of London Poppies100 years on from the start of the Great War, the moat of the ancient Tower of London contains a sea of blood-red poppies – some of which represent the dead of this small north Essex parish.

 

Lest we forget

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This blog
If you want to read more from my blog, please do subscribe either by using the Subscribe via Email button top right of my blog, or the button at the very bottom.  If you’ve enjoyed reading this post, then please do Like it with the Facebook button and/or leave a comment below.

Thank you for reading this post.

You may also be interested in
Reflections on the Tower of London’s Poppies
The war to end all wars
Christmas Greetings from the Trenches
Great Dunmow’s Military Funeral: A follow-up
War and Remembrance: It’s a long way to Tipperary
War and Remembrance: Great Dunmow’s Emergency Committee
War and Remembrance: Great Dunmow’s Military Funeral 1914
Postcard home from the front – The Camera never lies
Postcards from the Front – from your loving son
Memorial Tablet – I died in hell
Memorial Tablet – I died of starvation
Memorial Tablet – I died of wounds
The Willett family of Great Dunmow
Postcard from the Front – To my dear wife and sonny
War and Remembrance – The Making of a War Memorial
Great Dunmow’s Roll of Honour
For the Fallen
Aftermath

© Essex Voices Past 2014.

Please click here to leave your comment

Reflections on the Tower of London’s Poppies

Yesterday was a very emotional day for me when I visited my granddad’s old school in Wandsworth, and heard about his life as a school-boy on the eve of the Great War.  As Emanuel’s school historian comments on the board displaying my granddad’s photo

In the summer of 1914 Emanuel boys went about the normal lives.  They played cricket on the field, they sang in a School concert in Battersea Town Hall and they attended prize giving…We broke up in July [1914] under the shadow of Armageddon and reassembled [in September] to find it a reality.

Emanuel at War Exhibition, November 2014

Visiting Emanuel school was intensely moving for me.  Not least, because I never knew my granddad, as I was two when he died.  A man who I’ve spent a great deal of time researching his family history and a man I would have loved to have known. A man I’m proud to call my granddad.  He joined the York and Lancaster Regiment one day short of his 18th birthday in 1917 and returned home after the Great War to his loving parents and child-hood sweetheart, never to mention those terrible times again to another living soul.

Emanuel School at War

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The whole day was incredible moving for me because on my way through to South London from North Essex, I stopped by the ceramic poppy display at the Tower of London.

I had heard a lot of negative comments about these beautiful poppies before I went, and also heard plenty more negative remarks whilst I spent 2 hours walking and contemplating the exhibition.  Directly behind me, a man commented (clearly aimed at me) “90% of the people here don’t know what it’s about and have come to gawp.”  Well, sir, leaving aside that your comment aimed at me was incorrect because I’ve spent the last 10 years of my life researching my own local war memorial in Great Dunmow (long before it was “fashionable”),  you totally missed the point about the remaining 89.999% of visitors.

It doesn’t matter that previously 90% showed no interest in the past.  The fact that they are showing interest today, and have stopped during their busy 21st century lives to take photographs, comment, ponder and wonder, means that all those 888,246 lost lives have not been forgotten.  100 years after the start of Armageddon, hundreds of thousands of people have flooded to see this incredible display of lives and families destroyed.

I saw young heavily fake-tanned women taking “selfies”, along with old veterans displaying their medals.  I saw fully kilted uniformed Scottish soldiers, along with twenty-somethings wiping tears away.  Veterans, pensioners, London workers, tourists, young people and children all stood shoulder-to-shoulder.  The fact is, Paul Cummins’ remarkable Sea of Blood is for absolutely everyone to pause in their lives and to reflect back to that terrible time 100 years ago.

The Great War affected all our families 100 years ago, and is now touching their descendants hearts today.

The controversy of the display at the Tower reminds me back to the days even whilst the Great War was still raging when the question of War Memorials started to be hotly debated all over towns and villages of a devastated Britain.  The building of War Memorials were highly emotional with bereaved communities totally unable to decide what was the best way to commemorate their dead.  My own North Essex town of Great Dunmow has a war memorial – but reading the meeting minutes regarding its building shows that in 1918 this was a deeply divided and grieving community.  These are cold-hard meeting minutes reporting facts, but even now, they show unwitting testimony of highly charged and emotional council meetings. No-one being able to decide anything: a community torn apart in their grief and frozen in their indecisiveness.

Back to today, and yes, the Tower of London Poppy display is controversial, and the motives of some of its visitors questionable.  But it is a very visual display of a shattered nation, and a shattered world.

If you have a chance to see the Tower of London’s “Blood swept Lands and Seas of red” before it is dismantled after 11th November 2014, do go.  Take photos.  Put them on Facebook, tweet them, publish them. By doing so those  888,246 lost souls – indeed the world’s lost souls from all the combatant nations – will always remain in our hearts.

They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old:
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning
We will remember them.

Tower of London PoppiesThe walls of the ancient Tower of London hemorrhaging the nation’s blood

Tower of London PoppiesIn amongst the poppies, a poignant reminder from a bereaved family

Tower of London PoppiesThe poppies and London’s iconic Victorian landmark – Tower Bridge

Tower of London PoppiesThe past and the present: The Shard skyscraper rises up above the sea of blood

Tower of London PoppiesSomewhere in this sea of blood lies poppies representing 3 lost lives from my family

Emanuel School at WarThe ghostly images of Emanuel’s 1913 XV projected onto the school building. Eight of those boys never returned from the Great War.  They were my granddad’s schoolmates and later, his comrades in arms.  Amongst the 888,246 poppies at the Tower of London, 8 poppies represent the lost lives of these boys.

 

Lest we forget

 

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This blog
If you want to read more from my blog, please do subscribe either by using the Subscribe via Email button top right of my blog, or the button at the very bottom.  If you’ve enjoyed reading this post, then please do Like it with the Facebook button and/or leave a comment below.

Thank you for reading this post.

You may also be interested in
The war to end all wars
Christmas Greetings from the Trenches
Great Dunmow’s Military Funeral: A follow-up
War and Remembrance: It’s a long way to Tipperary
War and Remembrance: Great Dunmow’s Emergency Committee
War and Remembrance: Great Dunmow’s Military Funeral 1914
Postcard home from the front – The Camera never lies
Postcards from the Front – from your loving son
Memorial Tablet – I died in hell
Memorial Tablet – I died of starvation
Memorial Tablet – I died of wounds
The Willett family of Great Dunmow
Postcard from the Front – To my dear wife and sonny
War and Remembrance – The Making of a War Memorial
Great Dunmow’s Roll of Honour
For the Fallen
Aftermath

© Essex Voices Past 2014.

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Halloween 2014

Happy Halloween!!

Whatever you and your children are doing this evening, I wish you fun and laughter.  For the first time in many years, we will not be going trick or treating to our neighbours. Instead, as my son is a now pre-teenager, we will be visiting Colchester’s Zoo’s Fright Night.  As I am the biggest scaredy cat in the world and hate horror films, I’m not sure if this is entirely advisable.  But I am sure that my son will enjoy himself!

Here’s some beautiful early 20th century postcards of Halloween from America.  The modern celebration of Halloween involving pumpkins, witches and black cats did not seem to have happened in Britain until relatively recent times. Therefore, I have yet to see any  British Halloween postcards dating from the same era as the American ones.

American Halloween postcards

American Halloween postcards

American Halloween postcards

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If you want to read more from my blog, please do subscribe either by using the Subscribe via Email button top right of my blog, or the button at the very bottom.  If you’ve enjoyed reading this post, then please do Like it with the Facebook button and/or leave a comment below.

Thank you for reading this post.

You may also be interested in
Witchcraft and witches in Elizabethan Essex
Christmas Greetings from the trenches: 1914-1918
Using vintage postcards for local or family history

© Essex Voices Past 2014.

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Suffolk Voices Past

I had a fantastic week last week, touring the internet and talking on various blogs about my life long passion for “all things history”.  I would like to thank all the wonderful bloggers who hosted my posts throughout the week. I have been truly overwhelmed by the response and lovely comments I have received on all the blogs.

As well as touring the internet, I was also busy researching my next two books for Amberley – Sudbury, Long Melford and Lavenham Through Time, and Saffron Walden Through Time.

Last week, I had considerable breakthroughs with both books, which hopefully I can share nearer the time of each book’s publication next summer.  However, for the moment, I would like to share with you a picture I bought on the internet some months ago.  This week, I managed to identify the lady and also, with the help of Google Maps, exactly where she is sitting in Long Melford.  The picture had puzzled me for some time, because the angle of photograph made the building in the top left corner seem like one of the maltings buildings still in existence within Long Melford.  But it’s not, it’s actually a large red-brick building from the 1860s.

Meet Kate Salter, Edwardian resident of Long Melford, taking a break in the roadside outside Daniel Spilling’s Saddlery shop in Hall Street, in summer 1907.

Sudbury, Lavenham, Long Melford Through Time by Kate Cole

I look forward to bringing you tales about Sudbury, Long Melford, Lavenham and Saffron Walden Through Time in the run-up to my next two local history books being published next year.

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My book
My local history book on the historic East Hertfordshire town of Bishop’s Stortford has just been published.  Please do click on the image below to buy my book.Bishop's Stortford Through Time by Kate Cole

This blog
If you want to read more from my blog, please do subscribe either by using the Subscribe via Email button top right of my blog, or the button at the very bottom.  If you’ve enjoyed reading this post, then please do click Like button and/or leave a comment below. Thank you for reading this post.

© Essex Voices Past 2014.

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History Blog Tour – Day 7: Bishop’s Stortford – the postcards which got away

This week, to celebrate the publication of my first local history book, Bishop’s Stortford Through Time, I am very excited to be doing tour around various blogs talking about various aspects of my book: not just the subject matter, but also about writing and researching “history”.

One post a day – so 7 posts in total – spread across a wide and diverse mix of history-related blogs.

Today, day 7, I am back on my own blog to show some the postcards, photographs and pictures of Bishop’s Stortford which got away.  Postcards and images which I couldn’t include in my book for one reason or another.

Two mile start
Unfortunately, I was unable to identify this image of the “Two Mile Start”.  There is a group of women central to the image, which when zoomed in, shows that they are wearing very elegant Edwardian summer dresses with hats.  The official standing in front of the flag on the right is very formally dressed with what appears to be a watch on a chain.  The hoi polloi appear to be the crowd on the left edge of the postcard.

Whatever event this was, it looks to be have been supported throughout the entire town, from all ranks of Edwardian society.  Its location could have been on the cricket pitch by Cricketfield Lane on the outskirts of the town.

Where or whatever this was, it is a fantastic social history postcard of Bishop’s Stortford at play.
Bishop's Stortford Through Time by Kate Cole
Distance views of the town

Bishop's Stortford Through Time by Kate Cole1821 etching by J Mawman showing Bishop’s Stortford in 1669. The town’s Norman castle in the foreground and the parish of St Michael’s in the distance.

Bishop's Stortford Through Time by Kate ColeEdwardian view of the town photographed from the rooftops.  The parish church’s spire in the distance.

Bishop's Stortford Through Time by Kate ColeEdwardian view of the town photographed from the top of Waytemore Castle mound.  The ever-present parish church’s spire in the distance.

The Causeway
The rural beauty of the Edwardian Causeway.  Now a busy major ring-road within the town centre.

Bishop's Stortford Through Time by Kate Cole
Bishop's Stortford Through Time by Kate Cole
Bishop's Stortford Through Time by Kate Cole
Bishop's Stortford Through Time by Kate Cole

Windhill
Victorian and Edwardian children going about their business in Windhill – compared to the modern-day influx of cars.  At least the lamp-post has remained!  The first photograph is a carte de viste photograph from 1866.

Bishop's Stortford Through Time by Kate Cole

Bishop's Stortford Through Time by Kate Cole

Bishop's Stortford Through Time by Kate Cole

The CDV photograph of St Michael’s church is fascinating.  I wrote a blog post about it here and explained why I think it dates from 1866.

I had great problems photographing this area of Bishop’s Stortford – I must have visited it to take photographs on varying days and at varying times at least 20 times.  But always always there were cars.  Windhill was originally going to be the front cover of my book, but the cars were just too prominent in all the modern day photographs.  So we had to ditch that idea.

On one particularly eventual day, we decided to visit early on a Saturday and take the photographs of my children and their spouses.  This is the photograph which opens Chapter 2 of my book.  Getting my children all together at the same time was the first problem and a feat in its own right.  The second problem was that as we all drove up to Windhill, my husband decided to park his car in the area exactly where the photograph was to be taken.  I wasn’t impressed with this, and nor was he when he had to move the car. (Yes, there were “words”!)

Our final problem was… After my girls and their spouses had left, I decided to pay a quick visit to the church to take a couple of photographs.  We were only gone no more than 10 minutes. But by the time we came out there was a traffic warden fast approaching our car…  I’m glad to say we (just) beat him to our car…

I suspect the Victorian and Edwardian photographers of these images didn’t have such problems!

Bishop's Stortford Through Time by Kate Cole

Workman’s revenge
Finally, this newspaper article in the Chelmsford Chronicle in June 1912 tickled me
Bishop's Stortford Through Time by Kate Cole
My blog tour
I have thoroughly enjoyed doing a blog tour around the internet.  It has felt very self-indulgent being able to talk about my hobby – history – which has been a life-long passion for me.  Thank you for taking time out and reading my posts.

To recap, I have been on the following blogs this week:-

About me
I have a MSt in Local and Regional History (Cantab); a BA History (Open University) and an Advanced Diploma in Local History (Oxon) – all gained as a mature student. Having been a business technologist in the City of London for the last 30 years, I am currently taking time away from my City career to write. My first history book, Bishop’s Stortford Through Time, was published by Amberley Publishing in September 2014. I have been commissioned to write a further three history books for them:-

  • Sudbury, Lavenham and Long Melford Through Time (due to be published summer 2015);
  • Saffron Walden Through Time (due to be published summer 2015); and
  • Postcards from the Front: Britain 1914-1919 (due to be published summer 2016).

I live in Essex, England, and regularly write about the local history of Essex and East Anglia on my blog.

Please do click on the image below to buy my book.Bishop's Stortford Through Time by Kate Cole



© Essex Voices Past 2014.

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History Blog Tour – Day 6: Local history & Bishop’s Stortford

This week, to celebrate the publication of my first local history book, Bishop’s Stortford Through Time, I am very excited to be doing tour around various blogs talking about various aspects of my book: not just the subject matter, but also about writing and researching “history”.

One post a day – so 7 posts in total – spread across a wide and diverse mix of history-related blogs.

Today, day 6, you can read me on Bishop’s Stortford’s Museums blog talking about Local history and Bishop’s Stortford. Please click on the link or picture below to read my post.

My blog tour
You can catch me on the following dates and blogs discussing “all things history”, along with explaining about my recent book, on the following dates and sites.

About me
I have a MSt in Local and Regional History (Cantab); a BA History (Open University) and an Advanced Diploma in Local History (Oxon) – all gained as a mature student. Having been a business technologist in the City of London for the last 30 years, I am currently taking time away from my City career to write. My first history book, Bishop’s Stortford Through Time, was published by Amberley Publishing in September 2014. I have been commissioned to write a further three history books for them:-

  • Sudbury, Lavenham and Long Melford Through Time (due to be published summer 2015);
  • Saffron Walden Through Time (due to be published summer 2015); and
  • Postcards from the Front: Britain 1914-1919 (due to be published summer 2016).

I live in Essex, England, and regularly write about the local history of Essex and East Anglia on my blog.

Please do click on the image below to buy my book.Bishop's Stortford Through Time by Kate Cole

© Essex Voices Past 2014.

2 Comments: Please click here to leave your comment

History Blog Tour – Day 5: Vintage postcards and family or local history

This week, to celebrate the publication of my first local history book, Bishop’s Stortford Through Time, I am very excited to be doing tour around various blogs talking about various aspects of my book: not just the subject matter, but also about writing and researching “history”.

One post a day – so 7 posts in total – spread across a wide and diverse mix of history-related blogs.

Today, day 5, you can read me on Julie Goucher’s blog Anglers Rest talking about Using vintage postcards to add to family and local history research. Please click on the link or picture below to read my post.

My blog tour
You can catch me on the following dates and blogs discussing “all things history”, along with explaining about my recent book, on the following dates and sites.

About me
I have a MSt in Local and Regional History (Cantab); a BA History (Open University) and an Advanced Diploma in Local History (Oxon) – all gained as a mature student. Having been a business technologist in the City of London for the last 30 years, I am currently taking time away from my City career to write. My first history book, Bishop’s Stortford Through Time, was published by Amberley Publishing in September 2014. I have been commissioned to write a further three history books for them:-

  • Sudbury, Lavenham and Long Melford Through Time (due to be published summer 2015);
  • Saffron Walden Through Time (due to be published summer 2015); and
  • Postcards from the Front: Britain 1914-1919 (due to be published summer 2016).

I live in Essex, England, and regularly write about the local history of Essex and East Anglia on my blog.

Please do click on the image below to buy my book.Bishop's Stortford Through Time by Kate Cole

© Essex Voices Past 2014.

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History Blog Tour – Day 4: Correlation between local and family history

This week, to celebrate the publication of my first local history book, Bishop’s Stortford Through Time, I am very excited to be doing tour around various blogs talking about various aspects of my book: not just the subject matter, but also about writing and researching “history”.

One post a day – so 7 posts in total – spread across a wide and diverse mix of history-related blogs.

Today, day 4, you can read me on Pauleen Cass’s blog Family history across the seas talking about Correlation between local and family history. Please click on the link or picture below to read my post.

My blog tour
You can catch me on the following dates and blogs discussing “all things history”, along with explaining about my recent book, on the following dates and sites.

About me
I have a MSt in Local and Regional History (Cantab); a BA History (Open University) and an Advanced Diploma in Local History (Oxon) – all gained as a mature student. Having been a business technologist in the City of London for the last 30 years, I am currently taking time away from my City career to write. My first history book, Bishop’s Stortford Through Time, was published by Amberley Publishing in September 2014. I have been commissioned to write a further three history books for them:-

  • Sudbury, Lavenham and Long Melford Through Time (due to be published summer 2015);
  • Saffron Walden Through Time (due to be published summer 2015); and
  • Postcards from the Front: Britain 1914-1919 (due to be published summer 2016).

I live in Essex, England, and regularly write about the local history of Essex and East Anglia on my blog.

Please do click on the image below to buy my book.Bishop's Stortford Through Time by Kate Cole

© Essex Voices Past 2014.

Please click here to leave your comment